The Medill Justice Project, founded at Northwestern University in 1999, is an award-winning investigative journalism enterprise that examines potentially wrongful convictions, probes national systemic criminal justice issues and conducts groundbreaking research. As journalists, we advocate only for the truth.

–Prof. Alec Klein, director of The Medill Justice Project

Wrongly Convicted Texas Man Joins Houston Crime Lab Board

Wrongly Convicted Texas Man Joins Houston Crime Lab Board

Anthony Graves, who served nearly 20 years in prison before being freed, will help direct the city’s crime lab after he was appointed to the board of the Houston Forensic Science Center. Read the full story here.

Wrongly Convicted New York Man to Receive Compensation

Wrongly Convicted New York Man to Receive Compensation

Jonathan Fleming, who was released from prison last year after serving 24 years for a murder he didn’t commit, will receive a settlement of $6.25 million from New York City. Read the full story here.

Three Wrongly Convicted Californians to Receive Compensation

Three Wrongly Convicted Californians to Receive Compensation

Gov. Jerry Brown signs legislation awarding nearly $1 million in settlements to three wrongfully convicted Californians, including former star football player Brian Banks. Read the full story here.

Texas Death Row Inmate Is Free from Prison

Texas Death Row Inmate Is Free from Prison

Prosecutors drop charges against Alfred Dewayne Brown, a Houston man who was convicted of capital murder and incarcerated for more than a dozen years. Read the full story here.

Code of Silence
Detective Arthur Nanni showed the surviving victim and sole eyewitness who testified at trial a photo array that included a picture of Andre Gonzales (pictured bottom left). The eyewitness identified Gonzales as his attacker with “60 percent” certainty. (Photo courtesy: Prosecutors’ office)

Code of Silence

The Medill Justice Project has tracked down a man who said he witnessed a murder a decade ago—and he said the accused who is serving a life sentence for the crime is not the killer. Read the full story here.

Excerpts from an Interview: Arnold “Maniac” Clark

Excerpts from an Interview: Arnold “Maniac” Clark

The Medill Justice Project releases more audio clips from an interview with a new eyewitness who says a convicted killer did not commit a Miami murder. Listen to the clips here.

Prosecutors to Investigate Claims that a Miami Man Convicted of Murder Is Innocent

Prosecutors to Investigate Claims that a Miami Man Convicted of Murder Is Innocent

Miami-Dade prosecutors said they are looking into claims that a man convicted of a Miami murder is innocent in the wake of a Medill Justice Project investigation of the 2005 case. Read the full story here.

Photo Essay: Liberty City

Photo Essay: Liberty City

See images from the Liberty City neighborhood where the decade-old murder occurred. View the photo essay here.

Appeals Court Grants Medill Justice Project Access to Medical Records

Appeals Court Grants Medill Justice Project Access to Medical Records

The Medill Justice Project won access to medical records in a Madison-area shaken-baby syndrome case after a more than yearlong battle for the documents. Read the full story here.



A video from our Kenny “Zulu” Whitmore investigation.

May 2015

In May 2015, The Medill Justice Project and the Wisconsin State Journal won a silver award in the Milwaukee Press Club Excellence in Wisconsin Journalism contest in “Best Explanatory Story or Series” for our investigation of Jennifer Hancock’s shaken-baby syndrome case. The two-part investigative series was done in partnership with the Wisconsin State Journal and published on page one of the newspaper in May 2014.

May 2015

In May 2015, the Society of Professional Journalists selected The Medill Justice Project as a national finalist in the Mark of Excellence Awards in “Online News Reporting” for our investigation of Kenny “Zulu” Whitmore’s case. The awards recognize the best collegiate work published or broadcasted in 2014.

May 2015

In May 2015, The Medill Justice Project won a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, the first in Medill’s history, in the college journalism category for our series of stories in 2014 on potentially wrongful convictions. Established in 1968, this national award honors investigative reporting on social justice and human rights issues. Entries are judged by more than 50 journalists who recognize winners in 12 domestic and international categories.

May 2015

In May 2015, the Chicago Headline Club, the largest chapter of the national Society of Professional Journalists, awarded The Medill Justice Project three Peter Lisagor Awards for Exemplary Journalism. The Medill Justice Project won in “Best All Media: Best Investigative Reporting” for our reporting on potentially wrongful convictions and “Best All Media: Best Deadline Reporting” for our breaking news coverage of Jennifer Del Prete’s release from prison. The Medill Justice Project was honored over the Chicago Tribune and The Center for Public Integrity in those two categories. The “Best All Media” categories include entries from daily and non-daily print publications, specialty and trade publications and broadcast television and radio outlets. The Medill Justice Project also won in “Online: Best Feature Story or Series” for our reporting on potentially wrongful convictions and was a finalist in “Online: Best Use of News Video” and “Online: Best Non-Deadline Reporting Online.”

April 2015

In April 2015, The Medill Justice Project won a Sigma Delta Chi Award from the national Society of Professional Journalists in “Deadline Reporting” for our coverage of Jennifer Del Prete’s release from prison in the wake of MJP’s investigation. Judges selected 85 honorees from more than 1,600 submissions from professionals across the United States.