The Medill Justice Project, founded at Northwestern University in 1999, is an award-winning national investigative journalism center that examines potentially wrongful convictions, probes systemic criminal justice issues and conducts groundbreaking research. As journalists, we advocate only for the truth.

–Prof. Alec Klein, director of The Medill Justice Project

Arkansas Executes Two Inmates Monday

Arkansas Executes Two Inmates Monday

The state executes convicted murderers Jack H. Jones Jr. and Marcel Williams via lethal injection –  the first time in 17 years that a state executes two inmates in one day. Read the full story here.

Wrongly Convicted Ohio Man Is Free

Wrongly Convicted Ohio Man Is Free

A judge vacates Evin King’s murder conviction after questions were raised about the forensic evidence in the case. Read the full story here.

Arkansas Halts Execution of Convicted Murderer

Arkansas Halts Execution of Convicted Murderer

After an attempt to carry out eight executions in less than two weeks, the State Supreme Court stays the execution of Don W. Davis, who would have been the first execution in Arkansas since 2005. Read the full story here.

Stranger Than Fiction? Third in a series
A 1975 murder on Marlboro Avenue—pictured in 2017—turned neighbors into victims, defendants and witnesses. Some accounts of what happened call into question who saw what and whether the convicted killer pulled the trigger. (Allisha Azlan/The Medill Justice Project)

Stranger Than Fiction? Third in a series

Investigating an old murder case built on circumstantial evidence, The Medill Justice Project finds police records and witness accounts that don’t add up. Read the full story here.

Stranger Than Fiction? Second in a series

Stranger Than Fiction? Second in a series

MJP publishes what is believed to be the most comprehensive publicly available database of recovered memory cases. View the database here.

Stranger Than Fiction? First in a series

Stranger Than Fiction? First in a series

Deep in a Pittsburgh murder case: Can a witness suddenly remember a crime 15 years later? Read the full story here.

Shaken–one of a five-part series

Shaken–one of a five-part series

MJP audio story delves into shaken-baby syndrome case of teenage mother in Michigan. Listen to the podcast here. Listen to the French version here.

Shaken–one of a five-part series

Shaken–one of a five-part series

Could accidents and illnesses discovered by MJP have played a role in a child’s death? Read the full story here.


April 2017

In April 2017, The Medill Justice Project won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association for feature reporting for our video on the Tonia Miller case. The Murrow Awards are the embodiment of the values and principles set forth by Edward R. Murrow, a journalism pioneer who set the standards for the highest quality of broadcast journalism.

April 2017

In April 2017, The Medill Justice Project won a first place regional Mark of Excellence Award in “Radio In-Depth Reporting” for the fourth episode of the Death Denied podcast. MJP was also named a finalist in “Best Independent Online Student Publication.” The Mark of Excellence Awards are presented by the Society of Professional Journalists and honor the best collegiate journalism. Regional first place winners advance to the national competition.

April 2017

In April 2017, The Medill Justice Project gave a talk at the Journalism Education Association/National Scholastic Press Association Spring National High School Journalism Convention in Seattle about its work.

April 2017

In April 2017, the Chicago Headline Club named The Medill Justice Project a finalist for seven Peter Lisagor Awards. The Lisagor awards, which are open to professional journalists in Illinois and parts of Indiana, honor superior contributions to journalism. MJP is being recognized for our reporting, podcasts, television programming and video.