The Medill Justice Project, founded at Northwestern University in 1999, is an award-winning investigative journalism enterprise that examines potentially wrongful convictions, probes national systemic criminal justice issues and conducts groundbreaking research. As journalists, we advocate only for the truth.

–Prof. Alec Klein, director of The Medill Justice Project

Wrongly Convicted New York Man to Receive Compensation

Wrongly Convicted New York Man to Receive Compensation

After serving 14 years for a murder he didn’t commit, Kareem Bellamy will get $2.75 million from the state. Read the full story here.

Wrongly Convicted Cleveland Man Sues City, Detectives

Wrongly Convicted Cleveland Man Sues City, Detectives

Ricky Jackson, a man who served 39 years for a murder he didn’t commit, files a lawsuit against Cleveland and the detectives on his case. Read the full story here.

Wrongly Convicted Connecticut Man to Be Compensated

Wrongly Convicted Connecticut Man to Be Compensated

After serving more than four years for a sexual assault he didn’t commit, Hubert Thompson will receive $900,000 from the state. Read the full story here.

Pennsylvania Woman Leaves Prison After Serving 42 Years

Pennsylvania Woman Leaves Prison After Serving 42 Years

Letitia Smallwood is free from prison on bail after a judge overturned her conviction in a 1972 arson-murder case. Read the full story here.

The Medill Justice Project Partners with Washington Post on Yearlong Investigation of Shaken-Baby Syndrome–Part One

The Medill Justice Project Partners with Washington Post on Yearlong Investigation of Shaken-Baby Syndrome–Part One

 
Read “Prosecutors build murder cases on disputed Shaken Baby Syndrome diagnosis” here.

Court Rules Del Prete Can File New Petition in Light of New Evidence Discovered by MJP

Court Rules Del Prete Can File New Petition in Light of New Evidence Discovered by MJP

Jennifer Del Prete has scored a legal victory in the Appellate Court of Illinois, opening the door for her to challenge her shaken-baby syndrome murder conviction in Will County, Ill. Read the full story here.

Diagnosis in Translation

Diagnosis in Translation

Shaken-baby syndrome is being reconsidered across the globe, including in Sweden where the courts and government are weighing in. Read the full story here.

The Medill Justice Project Partners with Washington Post on Yearlong Investigation of Shaken-Baby Syndrome–Part Two

The Medill Justice Project Partners with Washington Post on Yearlong Investigation of Shaken-Baby Syndrome–Part Two

Read “Doctors who diagnosed Shaken Baby Syndrome now defend the accused” here.

Shot in the Dark

Shot in the Dark

The Medill Justice Project, in partnership with LSU and New Orleans-based media outlet The Lens, investigates the 2001 manslaughter conviction of rising rap star McKinley “Mac” Phipps Jr. Read the full story here.



A video from our Kenny “Zulu” Whitmore investigation.

May 2015

In May 2015, the Society of Professional Journalists selected The Medill Justice Project as a national finalist in the Mark of Excellence Awards in “Online News Reporting” for our investigation of Kenny “Zulu” Whitmore’s case. The awards recognize the best collegiate work published or broadcasted in 2014.

May 2015

In May 2015, The Medill Justice Project won a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, the first in Medill’s history, in the college journalism category for our series of stories in 2014 on potentially wrongful convictions. Established in 1968, this national award honors investigative reporting on social justice and human rights issues. Entries are judged by more than 50 journalists who recognize winners in 12 domestic and international categories.

May 2015

In May 2015, the Chicago Headline Club, the largest chapter of the national Society of Professional Journalists, awarded The Medill Justice Project three Peter Lisagor Awards for Exemplary Journalism. The Medill Justice Project won in “Best All Media: Best Investigative Reporting” for our reporting on potentially wrongful convictions and “Best All Media: Best Deadline Reporting” for our breaking news coverage of Jennifer Del Prete’s release from prison. The Medill Justice Project was honored over the Chicago Tribune and The Center for Public Integrity in those two categories. The “Best All Media” categories include entries from daily and non-daily print publications, specialty and trade publications and broadcast television and radio outlets. The Medill Justice Project also won in “Online: Best Feature Story or Series” for our reporting on potentially wrongful convictions and was a finalist in “Online: Best Use of News Video” and “Online: Best Non-Deadline Reporting Online.”

April 2015

In April 2015, The Medill Justice Project won a Sigma Delta Chi Award from the national Society of Professional Journalists in “Deadline Reporting” for our coverage of Jennifer Del Prete’s release from prison in the wake of MJP’s investigation. Judges selected 85 honorees from more than 1,600 submissions from professionals across the United States.

April 2015

In April 2015, The Medill Justice Project was a finalist for a Hillman Prize from the Sidney Hillman Foundation for our reporting on potentially wrongful convictions.