The Medill Justice Project, founded at Northwestern University in 1999, is an award-winning investigative journalism enterprise that examines potentially wrongful convictions, probes national systemic criminal justice issues and conducts groundbreaking research. As journalists, we advocate only for the truth.

–Prof. Alec Klein, director of The Medill Justice Project

North Carolina Man Goes Free After 37 Years in Prison

A panel of judges reviews new DNA evidence in a 1976 case and rules Joseph Sledge was wrongly convicted of double homicide. Read the full story here.

Wrongly Convicted Florida Man to Receive $7 Million

A federal appeals court upholds a jury verdict that found police officers liable for framing Anthony Caravella for a 1983 rape and murder. Read the full story here.

Massachusetts Court Updates Jury Instructions on Eyewitness Testimony

The state Supreme Judicial Court amends the directions judges give jurors to help them evaluate the reliability of eyewitness identifications. Read the full story here.

New York City to Reform Solitary Confinement Policies

City officials agree to ban the use of isolation for inmates age 21 and younger at Rikers Island jail complex. Read the full story here.

Wrongly Convicted New York Man to Be Compensated

After serving 26 years in prison for a 1977 murder he didn’t commit, Dewey Bozella reaches a tentative settlement with Dutchess County. Read the full story here.

Solitary Confinement for Mentally Ill Ends in Pennsylvania Prisons

Settling a lawsuit, the state Department of Corrections agreed to no longer incarcerate mentally ill prisoners in isolated cells. Read the full story here.

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McKinley Phipps Jr. speaks at the prison where he is serving time for a fatal nightclub shooting. (Photo courtesy: Sheila Phipps)

Shot in the Dark

The Medill Justice Project, in partnership with LSU and New Orleans-based media outlet The Lens, investigates the 2001 manslaughter conviction of rising rap star McKinley “Mac” Phipps Jr. Read the full story here.

Life After

Life After

Months after being released from prison, Jennifer Del Prete discovers a hard truth about the confines of life on the outside. Read the full story here.

Confession or Coercion?

Confession or Coercion?

The Medill Justice Project unearths new information never raised at trial that calls into question the conviction of Kenny “Zulu” Whitmore who has been held in solitary confinement for 35 years. Read the full story here.

Iowa Prisoner Fights Conviction in Federal Court

Iowa Prisoner Fights Conviction in Federal Court

In what may be his last chance at freedom, an Iowa inmate is challenging his conviction in federal court based in part on information published as part of a Medill Justice Project investigation. Read the full story here.

In the Hole

In the Hole

Kenny “Zulu” Whitmore fights against what he calls cruel and unusual punishment after 35 years in isolation as solitary confinement comes under greater scrutiny in the United States. Read the full story here.

January 2015

In January 2015, NOLA.com highlighted The Medill Justice Project’s investigation of local rapper McKinley “Mac” Phipps Jr.’s manslaughter conviction that was published by New Orleans-based media outlet The Lens. Read the full story here.

December 2014

In December 2014, The Louisiana Weekly republished The Medill Justice Project’s investigation of rapper McKinley “Mac” Phipps Jr.’s case in which new information raised questions about Phipps’ manslaughter conviction. Read the full story here.

December 2014

In December 2014, Jay Balfour wrote for HipHopDX about The Medill Justice Project’s investigation of McKinley “Mac” Phipps Jr.’s manslaughter conviction that was published by New Orleans-based media outlet The Lens. Read the full story here.

December 2014

In December 2014, New Orleans-based media outlet The Lens published The Medill Justice Project’s investigation of local rapper McKinley “Mac” Phipps Jr.’s case in which new information raised questions about Phipps’ manslaughter conviction. Read the full story here.

December 2014

In December 2014, lawyers and professors from China visited The Medill Justice Project through the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program to learn how MJP investigates potentially wrongful convictions.